Friday, December 3, 2010

New Arrivals: The Museum Of Jurassic Technology

Just in time for the holidays...


Al Richards Stereo Floral Radiography View-Master Reels

These delicate grayscale images, revealing such unexpectedly complex internal architecture and graceful geometries, may remind us of nebula clusters or jellyfish or gothic cathedrals or even our own illuminated tissues. Stripped to their essence, these once transitory blossoms come to us fixed in time, exemplars of the splendid symmetries of the universe.






No One May Ever Have The Same Knowledge Again: Letters to Mount Wilson Observatory 1915-1935

The Museum of Jurassic Technology is pleased to present the long awaited publication of No One May Ever Have the Same Knowledge Again, a collection of extraordinary letters written to the observers at Mount Wilson Observatory between 1915 and 1935 by people from all walks of life and the world over expressing their idiosyncratic understandings of the universe.
This book contains photographs of many of the most visually intriguing letters, and a collection of period plates from the observatory as well as photos of the astronomers to whom these remarkable letters were addressed.
1994, 120 pages, paperback, many b&w photographs.






Phantogram Set: Including The Great Pyramid & Noah's Ark



The phantogram is a unique form of stereoscopic drawing which when viewed with the prescribed viewer and from the proper perspective creates the extraordinary illusion of a fully dimensional object in "real" space in front of the observer. The carefully constructed geometry of this form of stereo drawing creates a remarkably convincing illusion that invites the viewer to manipulate, touch and penetrate the apparition. The phantogram set is packaged in an acid free glassine envelope and is accompanied by illustrated instructions and an appropriate anaglyphoscope (viewer). Set of two and viewer.








The Micromosaics of Harold Dalton (The Museum of Jurassic Technology)
2 View-Master reels with 6-page booklet.
The process by which Harold Dalton constructed micromosaics was a long and painstaking one. After devising a design, he would gather butterfly wings collected from the four corners of the globe. He stripped each wing of its scales using a needle and then sorted the individual scales by color, size, and shape, forming a working palette. Arranging the scales on glass slides was an equally laborious task. Using a microscope he would transfer an individual scale from palette to slide using a single boar bristle, and then position the scale using a thin glass tube through which he directed tiny puffs of air. Once in place, he adhered the scale to the slide by crushing it at one small spot against the glass. Butterfly wing scales are oily, and oil alone is in fact what holds them in place...






"Tell the Bees" Phantogram Set (The Museum of Jurassic Technology)

This set commemorates the Museum's exhibit, "Tell the Bees: Belief, Knowledge, & Hypersymbolic Cognition". The set contains eight color phantograms which measure 4"x4" each.






No One May Ever Have the Same Knowledge Again: Letters to Mt. Wilson Observatory/Stereo Views from the Main Astronomical Observatory of the Academy of Sciences at Pulkovo View-Master Reels






The Eye of the Needle (The Museum of Jurassic Technology)
Viewmaster reel with 8-page illustrated booklet containing an essay by Ralph Rugoff detailing the life and work of microminiaturist Hagop Sandaljian.
An unexpected sneeze or misdirected breath could blow away a microminiature with hurricane force, while a casual movement could sabotage the work of months. Since even a pulse in his fingers could cause an accident, Sandaldjian ultimately learned to apply his decisive strokes only between heartbeats.






The Museum of Jurassic Technology Jubilee Catalogue

The first comprehensive catalogue of the Museum's collections at the ten year mark, includes the complete text of the now out-of-print series of guide leaflets, including full transcripts of many exhibits, including the Delani-Sonnabend Halls and the Deprong Mori of the Tripsicum Plateau.

2001, hardcover, 119 pages.





View Master Reels $8.95





These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

Open every day, 11am to 7pm.

We accept Visa, MC, Amex, Paypal and cash.

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