Saturday, November 20, 2010

New Arrivals: Krazy Kat


Krazy & Ignatz 1931-1932: A Kat a'lilt with Song

Krazy & Ignatz 1931-1932: "A Kat Alilt with Song" is a hot-baked brickbat of a volume, adance with nearly two full years of the Sunday Krazy Kat (Herriman did not use color until 1935), snug between multiple pages of Herriman extras, including two premiere appearances of Krazy from 1909, never before reprinted; a sports page panorama of graphic fun with the French boxing champion Georges Carpentier; two extremely frank daily strip revelations about Krazy's dubious gender, with komments by Bill Blackbeard; plus an introduction by Blackbeard detailing the miraculous recovery of many of the Sunday pages in this volume from apparent newspaper oblivion, a new Debaffler page, and a stunning layout front and back and throughout by the inimitable Chris Ware!






Krazy & Ignatz 1933-1934: Necromancy by the Blue Bean Bush

Krazy & Ignatz 1933-1934 is a hot-baked brickbat of a volume, adance with nearly two full years of the Sunday Krazy Kat (Herriman did not use color until 1935), snug between multiple pages of Herriman extras, not the least of which include an introduction by Blackbeard, a new "DeBaffler" page, and layout front and back and throughout by the inimitable Chris Ware!





Krazy & Ignatz 1935-1936: A Wild Warmth of Chromatic Gravy

And now, starting with the sixth volume in Fantagraphics' acclaimed Krazy Kat reprint series, finally it's time for... color! After a brief hiatus in the mid-1930s, the heretofore black-and-white Sunday Krazy Kat returned in full spectacular color in June 1935. And so this volume includes all the Sunday strips from the latter half of 1935 and all of 1936, including one supremely rare instance of a page shot from an original syndicate proof sheet, all reproduced in sparkling, digitally cleaned-up color. The new color format also opens the floodgates for a massive amount of spectacular rare color art from series editor Bill Blackbeard's files, including a surprising color self-portrait by Herriman, several Kat watercolors executed for friends, peers, and relatives, some watercolored non-Krazy Kat material, a reproduction of a vintage archy and mehitabel dust jacket by Herriman — plus a period spoof of Krazy Kat by Minute Movies' Ed Wheelan, and several instances of other cartoonists imitating Herriman's unique "Family Upstairs / Krazy Kat" format. This volume also includes "The Kolor of Krazy Kat," a revelatory essay by journalist and critic Jeet Heer that addresses in-depth the mystery of Herriman's racial origins, and the varying ways in which Herriman dealt with them artistically throughout his career — a major addition to Herriman-related scholarship and commentary.






Krazy & Ignatz 1937-1938: Shifting Sands Dusts Its Cheeks in Powdered Beauty

George Herriman integrated full, spectacular color into Krazy Kat in June, 1935. The gorgeous evolution continues in our third color volume, which includes the Sunday strips from all of 1937 and 1938. With a full 104 Sunday pages this time around, this particular book is jam packed with little room for extras, but we did squeeze in a half-dozen or so pages' worth of never-before-seen Herriman memorabilia (all in color), including a spectacular full-color New Year's card illustration done for a friend.






Krazy & Ignatz 1941-1942: A Ragout of Raspberries

George Herriman integrated full, spectacular color into Krazy Kat in June, 1935. The gorgeous evolution continues in our fourth color volume, which includes the Sunday strips from all of 1941 and 1942. The color format opens the floodgates for a massive amount of spectacular, rare color art from series editor Bill Blackbeard and designer Chris Ware's files. Most of these strips in this volume have not seen print since originally running in Hearst newspapers over 60 years ago.






Krazy & Ignatz 1943-1944: He Nods in Quiescent Siesta

Krazy and Ignatz 1943-1944: "He Nods in Quiescent Siesta" covers the last two years of Herriman’s masterpiece. With this volume, Fantagraphics and its precursor Eclipse have reprinted the entire 29-year run of the Krazy Kat Sundays! Like Charles Schulz, George Herriman was a cartoonist to the very end. Aside from collecting the last masterful year and a half of Krazy Kat, this new volume offers a retrospective look at Herriman’s life at the drawing table, offering many never before seen samples of his original art (which the cartoonist often lovingly hand-colored for friends). Gathered from many scattered collections, these pages testify to Herriman’s invererate passion for drawing. Rounding out the volume are scores of Krazy Kat daily strips also from Herriman’s last years, further testament to the cartoonists vitality. Series editor and veteran comics historian, Bill Blackbeard, also provides a concluding, wide-ranging essay on the life and art of Herriman. More than a simple reprint collection, Krazy and Ignatz 1943-1944 portrays the full range of a cartoonist who remained an artist all his life.






The Kat Who Walked in Beauty

Presenting a unique, stand-alone companion to our Krazy & Ignatz series. The Kat Who Walked In Beauty collects many rare and unique dailies from the 1910s and 1920s. Though many readers are aware of Herriman's dynamic Sunday pages, few know that during 1920, in what must have been an editorially unrestrictive period for Herriman, he drew some of the most graphic and brilliantly conceived daily strips ever created; they look like "mini-Sunday" strips. This nine-month stretch of dailies, never-before-reprinted, is among the treasures included in this collection. The collection includes many other Herriman gems, including the very first stand-alone Krazy & Ignatz strips from 1911, and the illustrations from Herriman"s Krazy Kat Jazz pantomime/ballet, performed to captivated New York audiences in 1922. This book fills in several gaps in the daily strip history, reproduced at close to their original size.






Krazy & Ignatz: Tiger Tea

Krazy Kat's most surreal adventures were the famed Tiger Tea sequence where Krazy Kat imbibed of the psychedelia-inducing substance. This is George Herriman at his best, presented in the same era as Terry and the Pirates and Captain Easy. Krazy & Ignatz: Tiger Tea showcases a rare photo of Herriman sporting a Mexican sombrero and smoking a funny-looking cigarette.





These books, and thousands of others, can be purchased from:

Brickbat Books
709 South Fourth Street
Philadelphia, PA 19147

215 592 1207

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